Cyber Monday 2011: The Results

Posted on December 1, 2011 at 10:46 am

By: | Categories: Cyber Monday, eCommerce, Holiday Season

With the biggest online shopping day of the year finally over, how did Cyber Monday 2011 stack up against years past and other major online shopping days of this year’s holiday season? Let’s take a look…

  • According to IBM Coremetrics, Cyber Monday sales were up 33% from last year, a huge increase even from previous years. Here is a great graph highlighting exactly what times of the day sales were the best for Cyber Monday 2011…

…As you can see sales followed the same trend as previous years until the evening. In years past many holiday shoppers logged off as business hours came to an end, and although there was a small surge of sales in the late evening, sales generally peaked in the afternoon (2:05 PM was actually the peak sales time for Cyber Monday this year). However, on Cyber Monday 2011, sales not only hit record highs in the afternoon but there was a fundamental shift in the way consumers viewed Cyber Monday in the evening. Instead of going home and turning on the TV or partaking in other activities, consumers kept their computers, tablets, and smart phones by their side and continued shopping. Sales continued to rise in the early evening to record levels which were significantly higher than recent years.

  • Although Coremetrics doesn’t release final sales statistics, comScore has reported Cyber Monday 2011 sales as $1.25 billion dollars, or up 22% from Cyber Monday 2010. Although this figure is not fully aligned with the 33% reported by Coremetrics, it certainly supports the notion that Cyber Monday sales in 2011 increased substantially over the previous year.
  • Not only did overall sales increase, but so did average order value, which according to Coremetrics was up 2.6% from last year to $198.26. This is a great sign as not only are more orders being placed on Cyber Monday but more items are being purchased as well. The increase in average order value could be in part to the increased usage of free shipping thresholds and value-based discounts (i.e. get $40 off of $200).
  • As a possible result of the significant boost in late-night Cyber Monday shopping, mobile site traffic and mobile sales increased dramatically from Cyber Monday last year. The amount of people who used a mobile browser to access retailer sites on Cyber Monday 2011 increased from 3.9% in 2010 to 10.8% in 2011 (up 277% from last year). Mobile sales also saw a huge increase, accounting for 6.6% of all Cyber Monday sales in 2011, up from 2.3% last year (a 276% increase).
  • Cyber Monday was not the only day over the long Thanksgiving weekend which saw an increase in online sales. ComScore estimates online retailers sold approximately $1.3 billion dollars in merchandise on Thanksgiving and Black Friday combined, up 23% from last year. Here’s a direct comparison of online sales over time on Black Friday and Cyber Monday…

Cyber Monday vs Black Friday graph 2011

…Although Black Friday sales tended to trail off in the evening (probably due to all the early morning shoppers heading to bed early) you can see many shoppers woke up early not only to capitalize on in-store deals but also to get the best early morning deals online as well.

Cyber Monday 2011 was a historic day not only because of the record sales figures but also because it may signal a change in the way consumers shop online. Although in-store lines and sales for Black Friday were also up this year more shoppers than ever before had their mobile devices in-hand as they braved the crowded stores, ready to pounce on a deal whether it was online or offline. Retailers not only have an increase presence through an array of online channels and internet marketing but consumers now have more access to this presence thanks to these devices. As technology continues to evolve not only for the retailer but also for the consumer something tells me that Cyber Monday’s upward trend isn’t set to plateau anytime soon.

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